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Distance: 25 KM
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X-Ray Sinus Complete

Also known as

Paranasal sinuses X-ray

Sinuses are two air-filled pockets on both sides behind your forehead, nose, cheekbones and in between the eyes. These produce mucus, which is a liquid that protects the body by trapping and moving germs away. A sinus X-ray is a quick, painless and noninvasive test. Your doctor may order this alongside a CT scan or MRI to obtain images of your sinuses. There are four sets of sinuses:
  • Frontal sinuses: They are present on the middle of your forehead, above both left and right eyes.
  • Maxillary sinuses: These are present under your cheekbones near your upper jaw; they are also the largest sinuses.
  • Sphenoid sinuses: These are behind your skull, near your optic nerve and the pituitary gland.
  • Ethmoid sinuses: These are in the middle of your eyes, on the bridge of your nose.
  • A sinus X-ray is quick and straightforward and can give your doctor helpful information about your health. However, this test can only show an issue and does not help diagnose its cause. A sinus X-ray helps doctors observe any issues in your sinuses which can sometimes become blocked through fluid and mucus buildup. The mucus allows bacteria to grow and leads to inflammation and infection known as sinusitis. Since sinuses are generally filled with air, healthy sinuses appear black on an x-ray. A lighter or white section in this exam shows fluid buildup and can help diagnose various sinus issues.
    Your healthcare provider may order a sinus X-ray if you have symptoms of a sinus condition or sinusitis. You may have to get a sinus X-ray if you have:
  • a stuffy nose with white or yellow-green nasal secretions,
  • pain or soreness between your eyes, in your forehead, or jaw
  • swelling around the middle of your face
  • lessened sense of smell
  • postnasal drainage
  • fatigue
  • cough
  • sore throat
  • ear pain
  • fever
  • Your healthcare provider may order a sinus x-ray even if you do not have these symptoms but have had:
  • injury to your sinuses
  • an infection
  • a hemorrhage
  • tumor or other mass
  • undergone surgery
  • There is no special preparation needed unless your doctor advises otherwise. You do not need to fast beforehand or be sedated during the test. However, inform your doctor if you have an artificial eye since those can disrupt the X-ray. Additionally, notify your healthcare provider if you are pregnant since developing fetuses are more susceptible to radiation. If a sinus X-ray is essential, the technologist will take special care to keep the radiation exposure minimum.
    A usual sinus X-ray proceeds in the following way:
  • 1. You should remove any metal objects such as jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures or other objects that may impede the test.
  • 2. You will have to lie on an X-ray table for the exam, with your head between the X-ray machine and the image detector.
  • 3. The X-ray technician may use a foam piece to hold your head still and cover the lower section of your body with a lead shield.
  • 4. You will be asked to hold still for a few moments while the X-ray is taken. It is vital to remain motionless during the procedure since movement may affect the image's quality.
  • 5. A sinus X-ray may require you to be in several positions, which may be painful or uncomfortable if you are injured or have had surgery recently.
  • Your X-ray results will be interpreted by a radiologist who will prepare a report for your doctor. He/she will then discuss the report with you and start a treatment plan for you. In most cases, a sinus X-ray will be one in a series of tests. The X-ray may show evidence of a sinus problem but other tests can determine the specific cause. These may be:
  • nasal endoscopy or rhinoscopy
  • blood tests
  • MRI or CT scan
  • sinus puncture
  • bacteria culture
  • Your doctor will order these based on what your X-ray detects, such as an infection, blockages, bleeding or tumors. Speak with your doctor about your sinus X-ray results and the next steps in the diagnostic process.